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Portada > Mercado > Cascos Caberg

Cascos Caberg

El casco Caberg modelo Justissimo es un casco abatible, que cuenta con una serie de propiedades que lo hacen particularmente atractivo.

  • Escudo con doble protección anti-turbulencia (barbilla-nuca)
  • Articulaciones Flip-Flop de titanio. Cascos alternativos utilizan plásticos.
  • Aireadores móviles aerodinámicos (nariz, frente)
  • Kit de conversión incluído: de abatible (invierno) a bicera (verano). Se quita lo abatible.
  • Anillos de goma para aislación que impiden el ingreso de la lluvia
  • Visor anti-rayas y anti-empañadura
  • Interior Sanitized evita hongos, bacterias, microbios, previene deformaciones moldeadas
  • Acolchado CoolMax, altas propiedades absorción transpiración, aireado, certificado Dupont
  • Aerodinámica testeada en tunel de viento
  • Sistema de liberación rápida de hebilla
  • Pintado exterior
  • Circulación rotatoria de aire interior
  • Acolchado interior desmontable para lavado y limpieza
  • Doble visor (transparente y color opaco (tipo piloto), este último controlado exteriormente
  • Sistema de liberación rápida de visor
  • Fabricado en Italia, igual que Nolan
  • Cumple con la Norma E3 y con el estándar ECE 2205 Europeo
  • Vida útil: 5 años, excepto si el casco es expuesto a impactos violentos antes de su expiración

Su precio de mercado en Santiago de Chile, luego de varios sondeos es de $ 180.000.- hacia arriba.


Existen 8 medidas, que se pueden apreciar en imagen adjunta.

Los interesados en adquirirlos pueden verlos en los siguientes locales y comunicarse posteriormente con Alejandro Silva ( webmaster@chms.cl ) para obtener descuento por volúmenes.

MOTOS SYM AV. VITACURA 8207

COMERCIAL DANTE  AV.VITACURA 8641

COMERCIAL LOS CIRUELOS  AV.VITACURA 9360

COMERCIAL  YAMACENTER  AV. LAS CONDES 8326

WHAT IS THE ECE 2205 STANDARD ?

The four basics types test required by International Standards are the shock absorbtion, rigidity, deformation of the retention system, and the rotation stability.

The "shock absorbion test" determines the capacity of an helmet to absorb and dissipate the energy of a blow. During the test the deceleration of a helmet gauged headform falling free onto an anvil at given speed is measured. The "rigidity test" measures the maximal and residual deformation of a helmet submitted ti lateral or longitudinal compression. The "retention system test" mesures the maximal and residual elongation of the chinstrap of a helmet submitted to dynamic stress at a given energy. The stability measures the roll-of angle of a helmet submitted to a dynamic rotational face

 

MAY I CLEAN MY HELMET USING PETROL?

The of composite materials with which some outer shells are made of do not suffer for contacts with solvents or petrol. Nevertheless the thermoplastics outer shells and, in particular, the protective polystyrene inner shells must never be put in contact with such solvents, who severely influence the chemical links. This influence affects the mechanical characteristics of the materials causing inability to protect the head in the event of a choc. For similar reasons, it is advisable to affix stickers onto the external shell only if made of composite materials.

The of composite materials with which some outer shells are made of do not suffer for contacts with solvents or petrol. Nevertheless the thermoplastics outer shells and, in particular, the protective polystyrene inner shells must never be put in contact with such solvents, who severely influence the chemical links. This influence affects the mechanical characteristics of the materials causing inability to protect the head in the event of a choc. For similar reasons, it is advisable to affix stickers onto the external shell only if made of composite materials.

 

HOW CAN I CLEAN MY HELMET?

To avoid chemical aggression and discoloring of decorations, the outside of the helmet should be washed using mild soap water solution. The comfort padding (if not removable) and the chinstrap should be cleaned using wet soft cloths and left until complete drying. The fixed comfort padding may also be cleaned using dry foam, similar to the one used for carpet cleaning. Do not forget to brush the foam away after 15 minutes. For removable comfort padding please follow the directions contained in the instruction tags.

 

 

 

CAN I PAINT MY HELMET?

Many paints contain aggressive solvents that might weaken the molecular links of the thermoplastic materials making it brittle and almost unable for the use it has been designed for. The helmets manufacturers use paints that contain non aggressive solvents: these are carefully tested during production and application. The shells undergo preliminary preparation to guarantee the grip of the paint. Unqualified people should apply paints on shells made of composite materials only.

 

 

 

WHY I SHOULD NOT APPLY STICKERS ON MY HELMET?

Many promotional stickers are equipped with glue containing aggressive chemicals that may weaken the molecular links of the thermoplastic materials. The decorative stickers used by the helmets manufacturers uses glue that contain non aggressive solvents: these are carefully tested during pro-duction and application. Unqualified people should apply stickers on shells made of composite materials only.

 

 

 

HOW A HELMET IS MADE?

A helmet is made of three basic components: the external hard shell, to support and distribute the energy of a blow through its partial breakage, the soft inner shell to absorb and dissipate the resid-ual energy through its deformation and destruction, the retention system to hold the helmet in place and permit the two shells to make their job. Besides these components, other ones may be found on a helmet: a visor, fixed or including a open-ing mechanism, a sunproof peak, a chin guard, a comfort padding, a venting system, a communica-tion system.

 

 

 

HOW CAN YOU SEE WHETHER AN HELMET IS APPROVED?

The Regulation ECE 22 requires every helmet bear a label sewn on the retention system (i.e. on the chinstrap). This label bears the homologation mark, the homologation number, the production serial number.The homologation mark is an upper case E followed by a number, inscribed in a circle. The number following the upper case E represents the country who has granted the homologation. For instance E3 marks the helmets approved in Italy, E4 in Belgium, E1 in Germany, E6 in the Netherlands, etc. Below the E-mark there are two numbers: the left one is the homologation number assigned by the National Administrations, where the first two digits represent the series of amendments under which the model has been approved (04 represents the fourth, 05 the fifth, and so on); the right one is the production serial number. On the visor it is enough to see embossed the E-mark and the homologation number only.

 

 

 

WHAT IS AN APPROVAL?

To be freely marketed the helmets must comply with the standard enforced in the different coun-tries. These standards include both technical and bureaucratic requirements. Thus, the approval is the certification that the helmet complies with the standard enforced by a Country in order to permit the sale.

WHAT APPROVAL IS REQUESTED IN EUROPE?

In all the Countries of Europe the technical standard accepted by the government is the Regulation 22 of the Economic Commission for Europe (ECE) of the United Nations, in the most recent variant (called the amendment), which currently is the fifth. This is the standard commonly re-ferred as ECE 22-05. This standard requires the visor mounted on the helmets is approved, too. Some countries also accept regulations, other then ECE, valid only on their own national territory: in Spain for instance is possible to make and sell helmets approved to the standard RNFE, limited only to user of motorcycles with displacement under 50 cc. All other approvals, even valid or accepted somewhere else (such as DOT, Snell, JIS,…) are not ac-cepted for public roads use within Europe.

 

 

To be freely marketed the helmets must comply with the standard enforced in the different coun-tries. These standards include both technical and bureaucratic requirements. Thus, the approval is the certification that the helmet complies with the standard enforced by a Country in order to permit the sale. In all the Countries of Europe the technical standard accepted by the government is the Regulation 22 of the Economic Commission for Europe (ECE) of the United Nations, in the most recent variant (called the amendment), which currently is the fifth. This is the standard commonly re-ferred as ECE 22-05. This standard requires the visor mounted on the helmets is approved, too. Some countries also accept regulations, other then ECE, valid only on their own national territory: in Spain for instance is possible to make and sell helmets approved to the standard RNFE, limited only to user of motorcycles with displacement under 50 cc. All other approvals, even valid or accepted somewhere else (such as DOT, Snell, JIS,…) are not ac-cepted for public roads use within Europe.

 

IS THE PRODUCTION DATE OF A HELMET VISIBLE ON THE HOMOLOGATION LABEL?

No, it isn't. From the data included in the homologation label it is not possible to determine the exact date of production of a helmet. Several manufacturers emboss a code representing the date of pro-duction on the external shell.

 

 

 

A DATE OF EXPIRY APPLIES TO A HELMET?

Researches have shown no evidence of degradation of the materials used in the helmets manufacture due to the mere effect of the times passing by. Nevertheless the exposure to the atmosphere agents (extreme hot and extreme cold), and to the exposure and the contacts with the vapors of the lubricants and gasoline normally used in the motorist environment is likely possible it might have some sort of influence to the molecular links of the materials used. Moreover, because of its own nature, the helmet often undergo to shocks of different amplitude that could limit its peformances. For all these reasons, for the abuse to the comfort padding and for the technical evolution that make more modern and protective lids available, it is suggested to replace the helmet after 5 years of use. In case of intensive use this delay should be shortened accordingly. If a helmet supports a severe blow, even if there is no evidence of damage, it should be replaced.

 

 

 

Visite el Link http://www.webscootermania.com/paginas/Kiosco/Kiosco.htm# y encontrará el Curso completo sobre Técnicas de Conducción, en PDF.

 

 
 
 
 

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